Tag Archives: southern highlands

We Had a Barn-Raising Day in April

On April 11th members and friends of the community garden descended on the Garden site to carry out a “barnraising” (working bee). We got all three projects completed, thanks to our wonderful volunteers on the day.

Thanks to the Veolia Mulwaree Trust, we have had funding to build a new fenceline and create new raised garden beds to greatly increase the food-growing potential of Corlette Park for our local community.
Thanks to the Veolia Mulwaree Trust, we have had funding to build a new fenceline and create new raised garden beds to greatly increase the food-growing potential of Corlette Park for our local community.

Thanks to a grant from the Veolia Mulwaree Trust, Moss Vale Community Garden has installed a new fence behind our recently installed container/secure shed in the front area of our licenced area. We are in the process of completing the development of this area in line with the

development application approved by Wingecarribee Shire Council. This area will be open to the public at all times and we intend that it will be full of organically grown fresh fruit & veges by next summer. The fence bed will be planted up with more espaliered fruit trees that we have propagated ourselves, with edible groundcovers like white & pink-flowering strawberries and low growing berries like white currants, gooseberries and goji berries. Why not pop down and check it out. We are there every Wednesday & Friday and welcome visitors and prospective members.

The hothouse was moved on our Barnraising Day
The hothouse was moved on our Barnraising Day

The hothouse was lifted and moved across to a prepared base (thanks to Jim Skillen and Diny Jones for all of the work leading up to the event).

Axel Richter, Ed Messiah and John Marks put in a solid day to clad one wall of our container with mini orb, thanks to funding from the state government’s Community Building Partnership grant.

 

Our container is gradually being clad using recycled materials wherever possible.
Our container is gradually being clad using recycled materials wherever possible.

Then there are our regulars – those who not only keep the garden going from week to week, but also gave up a Saturday to pitch in and provide the muscle power to complete all of these projects as well as provide a scrumptious home-made lunch made with veges & fruit from the garden.

 

 

 

Our barnraisers breaking bread after a busy morning's working bee.
Our barnraisers breaking bread after a busy morning’s working bee.

How to Graft Fruit Trees

A LITTLE RAIN DIDN’T STOP THESE GRAFTERS!

Following a long, dry spell in the Southern Highlands, the skies opened and sent down a torrent of rain on the 17th August, the day we had scheduled our grafting workshop. Surprisingly, it didn’t deter this hardy bunch. All twenty participants turned up in their wet weather gear ready for action.
Explaining the grafting process

We crowded under our new, covered pergola for a bit of theory on why we might want to graft fruit tree varieties (to maintain heritage varieties, or graft onto rootstocks that dwarf the tree size for ease of management, or to top graft an old tree with new varieties, or even to multi-graft several varieties onto one rootstock to create a longer picking season for yards with limited growing space).
Time to start grafting

After demonstrations of various grafting techniques we practised using budding and grafting knives on some hazelnut tree prunings. I was holding my breath at this point of proceedings in case, despite demonstrations on how to avoid accidental severing of digits, there was a need to phone for an ambulance. All went well – emergencies averted! We were also fortunate to have some grafting pliers on hand – the omega cut as well as a commercial top grafting tool kindly loaned to us by experienced local orchardist, Ray Thiessen. Some people were determined to conquer the grafting knife, whilst others were pleased to have the ‘safer’ option of the grafting tools.
The job is easier with the right tools

By this time it was PIZZA time – a hot lunch was certainly the order of the day! Members of the community garden had been busy in the background making dough (Jo) and preparing pizza toppings (Cath). John and Kathi tended the fire and cooked the pizzas whilst Dini and Charlotte helped as gophers. Wood-fired pizzas have a beautiful flavour and were well-received. It was still raining!
Moving onto the next grafting job

Then we moved onto the ‘real’ thing. Participants selected from a wide range of locally-sourced scion whichever variety of fruit tree they wished to graft onto their complimentary rootstock. We had the option of four dwarfing rootstocks for apples, a dwarfing rootstock for pears and quinces and semi-dwarfing rootstocks for stone fruits and cherries. It was great watching people work in pairs to help bind the graft union with the grafting tape – probably the most difficult (and critical to the success of the operation) part of the grafting process.
Delicious woodfired pizza for lunch

By 2.30pm, (it was still raining) people were ready to head home to thaw out in front of the fire. It had been a successful day and we are hoping that by spring there will be lots of young, grafted fruit trees sprouting leaves at the participant’s homes. If the scion takes successfully to the roots, these trees will continue to grow on through summer, after which the grafting tape can be removed to allow continuing development of the young fruit tree.
Delicious woodfired pizza for lunch

If not, we are planning a summer budding workshop (it should have stopped raining by then!) at Moss Vale Community Garden for those participants whose rootstocks had survived but the graft union with the scion hadn’t. Budding gives us a second opportunity to re-use the original rootstocks and insert a bud of the variety we were hoping to graft.
A grafted apple tree ready to be planted.
WATCH THIS SPACE!