From Prunings to Basket Bed in One Day

On August 4th we opened our gates to welcome in our members and local residents to celebrate the passing of the Winter Solstice.

2013-08-03 MVCG-OpenDay (HugelkultureDemoByJoDodd) 026
Joy stokes the fire ready for the beef & lamb roast to follow.

We fired up the pizza oven, which was going to cook a winter roast beef and roast lamb, as a change from pizzas.  Then as people arrived, we commenced the highlight of the day – a demonstration of how to use your winter whippy prunings to make a Hugel Kultur bed.  Its a great way to turn a waste garden product (prunings) into a resource you can use on-site whilst saving a trip to the Resource Recovery Centre.  It will become clearer as the photos will show below:

Jo Dodd, a local environmental educator, kindly agreed to give a demonstration of how to incorporate your prunings in your garden as a resource.  Here she is with the first stage of building the basket bed.

From prunings to basket bed 2
The first layer is thick cardboard to exclude the light and kill the grass. Thick sticks are poked into the ground to provide the base onto which the long whippy prunings will be woven.
The weaving begins, watched by the members and friends.
The weaving begins, watched by the members and friends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the sides increase in height, the twiggy smaller prunings are thrown into the centre.  These will be covered with garden mix before planting out to perennial species.

As the sides increase in height, the twiggy smaller prunings are thrown into the centre. These will be covered with garden mix before planting out to perennial species.

The final part of the wall weaving involves twining whippy prunings around the last few layers to tie them in and complete the basket bed.  See below:

Here's a completed one that Jo made earlier in her own backyard.
Here’s a completed one that Jo made earlier in her own backyard.  Kathi suggests we turn ours into a basket with handle filled with living herbs.  It is only a matter of time before it happens!

Jo’s website:  www.lightfooteducation.com.au

is a great local resource if you are looking for environmental ideas and local activities relating to sustainable agriculture and sustainable living.

Sorry!  No photos of our feast available – we were all too busy tucking into our roasts!  But here’s a photo of our morning tea cake.

Kathi's home made pannefort
Kathi’s home made pannefort